Welcome to the instructor-led online discussions for Mu 101 (Spring 2020)! Each week, you’ll discuss a topic together based on a blog post I provide for you here. Think of this first online discussion as an ice breaker, a chance to share resources, and a way for you to set the tone for how you want our (online) time together to go this semester. I’ll get this conversation going by asking you two broad questions:

  • What sorts of things make a classroom (or online) environment welcoming for you? What can we together do in this class to make it as positive and effective a space as possible? Let’s define our standards as a community for how we want to treat each other and also share tips or techniques for doing well in a class.
  • What incentives are there besides grades? What kinds of feedback can you receive that isn’t a grade? What sorts of things can’t be graded?

Finally, there are several myths or misconceptions about learning. Each of the following is a statement which is untrue. What examples or explanations can you offer for why they are inaccurate or false?

  • Earning  good grade means that you know a lot about a subject
  • If an instructor teaches an idea, that means that students have learned it
  • Education means filling your brain with information
  • “Good” students or “smart” students don’t ask for help

An important note about this kind of writing practice

Notice that these questions are broad and open-ended—this is a classic “Dr. J.” prompt, and you’ll see many prompts like this over the semester. You can (and should!) take these questions in as many (surprising) directions as possible, draw upon your own specific experiences, and don’t feel limited by how they’re worded. If there’s something seemingly unrelated that they make you think of, then hey! that “unrelated” thing is actually related! That’s how you contribute the most to the conversation, and that’s how we all learn together.

Most importantly for blog-style discussions, do not try to answer all of the questions I’ve posed. Focus on the ones that you have a strong reaction to, and learn from other people’s comments that address the other questions. Leave space for others to move the conversation along. There is no prize for trying to do it all yourself.

Limit each of your comments to addressing a single question or topic. By doing so, you make it easier for others to see your point quickly and easily, rather than letting your good idea get lost in the middle of a long, multi-topic post. If you have several different ideas you want to share, make several different comments. Let each idea speak for itself.

Finally, refer to the handout you received the first day of class (click on this highlighted text to go to that page our class website) which describes the amount and kinds of contributions you’re expected to make to these online discussions. These are the parameters of good conversation that happens offline, and they’re how I’ll be grading your participation here.

I look forward to seeing what you write and how this semester will unfold!

-Dr. J.

32 thoughts on “Myths, Misconceptions, and Learning (Online discussion Jan 27-Feb 2)

  1. Hello. Going to take a gamble with this and post first. I hope this was what was asked for!

    What incentives are there besides grades? What kinds of feedback can you receive that isn’t a grade? What sorts of things can’t be graded?

    I think feedback that really addresses the topic at hand can be some of the most instructive content available to learners as a group. A good reply to a comment or blog post that isn’t talking at you is valuable.

    Finally, there are several myths or misconceptions about learning. Each of the following is a statement which is untrue. What examples or explanations can you offer for why they are inaccurate or false?

    “Education means filling your brain with information”.

    The above statement is inaccurate because filling your brain with information doesn’t necessarily make you an educated person. Sometimes, the only way to learn something is to experience the subject firsthand. This might be listening to a piece of music over and over until you know it well, or practicing basic melodies until you’ve mastered an instrument at a basic level, for example. A well-rounded learner of music could study music from textbooks and fill their minds with tons of information, for example, and regrettably never grasp the true essence of music if they’ve somehow never even listened to music before (which could happen).

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  2. Hey, sort of tricky question when ones asked how to be welcomed but I like it.
    What sorts of things make a classroom (or online) environment welcoming for you? What can we together do in this class to make it as positive and effective a space as possible?

    When thinking of music and a welcoming environment I hear music, music is what brings calming to one or the timid to be less timid. A welcoming environment for me is where everyone is responsive, where there’s no lack of conversation flow. Together we can all make a classroom lively it’s not the classroom it’s the people who choose to sit in it daily. Through my experience of lack of teacher to student communication, I feel as though that’s what brings down the positive effect in a class.
    While I may use a public figure as an example Maya Angelou who without the help of a teacher, might have never been where she is now. Angelou’s neighbor who turned teacher, Mrs. Flowers encouraged her to read, she took her to the library and that is where she found her passion.

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  3. Hi! Walking into class yesterday was a very interesting experience. I was exhausted but was pleasantly surprised to be greeted in person and that Dr. J had quickly learned all of our names, which for me instantly invoked a sense of community. My initial instinct was to run after seeing the amount of handouts, but my anxiety was eased after having a chance to participate in activities that were thought provoking and we were all given an opportunity to voice opinions about the environment in the classroom. It was refreshing to be able to express ourselves and our own ideas of what we as students need to feel comfortable and succeed in the classroom. While I haven’t had many experiences in a classroom structure of this nature, participating in conversations that present new ideas, thought processes, and even constructive criticism, all while being respectful of one another, are the building blocks for what I believe will be a very positive and effective for all of us.

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  4. What makes a classroom welcoming for me? I would say given the opportunity to get to know  everyone around me. I mean we’re all in this together so might as well get to know who we will be sharing our thoughts and ideas with. I strongly agree with isabelle5394 ” Walking into class yesterday was a very interesting experience”. Indeed it was a very interesting experience but also a very welcomed experience for me. I love getting to know new people and hearing their ideas. It helps me grow as a person and I personally believe it creates a more comfortable learning environment. I remember walking into a classroom in the beginning of the semester not knowing anyone or their names then walking out at the end of the semester the same way. I took from that class nothing but it took from me, everything.  

    In response to how we can achieve a positive and effective space, i was able to come up with three suggestions. They are as follows:

    1. Open mindedness – Be willing to consider new ideas presented and not too quick to criticize or reject. 

    2. Show respect – Being polite and kind to others in the room and giving who ever is speaking your full attention. It will show that what he or she had to say mattered and was received.

    3. Helping others – If it seems like someone is struggling with something, reach out to that person. If we are to be more of a community then that means working together for the betterment of everyone in said community.

    I Think that if we practice at least to of these, we could create a positive space in which to learn with and from each other. 

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  5. What sorts of things make a classroom (or online) environment welcoming for you?

    Ummm. The sorts of things that make a classroom environment welcoming for me. Interesting question. But putting aside “me,” for now. We all been through multiple classes of different grades from elementary through college, where the classroom environment differs as we age and welcoming doesn`t seem to fit much of the criteria of schooling anymore. For me, I`m not applying this to you. You may disagree.

    Anyways let’s do a quick flashback, starting off with preschools or kindergarten. We are talking about age 2-5 now, where it`s our first step of education aside from the ones taught from mama or papa or the entire family. Where most toddlers are introvert than extroverts, cause hey, you don`t know anyone yet, nevertheless you`re going to be nervous in a room full of other kids. And that`s where these amazing teachers and principles, staffs come in place. Hanging welcoming signs at the entrance door. Not the printed ones with the huge font but painted ones with possibly fishes around it or butterflies that were done together by several homeroom teachers. They would come and greet, making you feel welcome. And the hard part kicks in at that moment of comfort, the parents would now have to exit. Tears and shouts echo through the hallway. “Line up,” your homeroom teacher would possibly say with a puppet in her or his hand. Drawing the eyes of you, now leading you into your homeroom. You will be given assigned seats with your name written neatly on a name tag with cool borders around it. Colorful chairs in red, blue or yellow patterns around the room. Blue oval rug with the alphabets at the corner. Patches of cut out clouds circles the rooms nearly to the ceiling. Day 1, day 2, months in. You’re loving it, the teacher your new friends, activities that you would be doing in class and even homework you would have to complete. Your feeling welcome, a sense of comfort. Connecting the dots, coloring in the shapes. And this continues on until 5th grade. But the welcoming and greeting doesn`t continue like day 1 at your homeroom

    Now on to middle school and high school. From age 11-18, the entrance welcoming sign is in big bold fonts. You would walk in the entrance with individuals just like you. Nervous like you, some may pull out letters stating the assigned classrooms, some would pull out there phone with the picture taken on there photo. When seated at your homeroom, your assigned teacher would greet and on goes the year. Likewise to every other teacher, they aren`t as patient as the homeroom teacher you had in elementary, not much wears a smile nor even greets. Times ticking slow, “when is this class ever ending, I want to leave.” No more coloring, or filling dots. Homeworks assigned, reading assigned. Entertainment in life gets dull, some possibly lucky to go out and have fun while others would have afterschool, missed meals to study for SAT, passing regents. Just hoping to get accepted to a good college.

    I`m just shorting things up now, wouldn`t like any eye-roll. Lastly, college where on your first day. The welcoming sign in printed font, may not concern you anymore. The welcoming of the professor may not seem to matter. You just want to get things over with, sits at your first class where ever you like. Professor in, greets that friendly hello that you may never hear again. Now chasing with the clock, pens on paper or hands-on keyboard. Jotting notes down, keeping the minds busy. Not paying no mind to the classroom environment, just want to take the class, hit the time and leave. Everyone’s molded differently by time. And now back to me, my consciousness of the classroom environment exited my mind a while back in high school.
    But I definitely enjoyed and felt welcome in the first class we had, wasn`t expecting the “hellos” and “hey”, an eye to eye contact, a good memorization of everyone’s name in a short amount of time. Loving the moment where every student introduces themselves. Quite awkward with the group gathers, but I would like more group gather. The interaction in a classroom is still unfamiliar to me. I am feeling the vibe of the classroom. I`m not a talkative person in a room with a bunch of students, but by the time I`ll feel more comfortable.

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  6. The things that makes the classroom environment welcoming for me is having everyone being able to introduce themselves like we did today in class. What we can do together to make this class a positive and effective space as possible is to learn to listen to one another and respect everyone’s opinions about a topic that we are focusing on. and most importantly to be patient with one another.

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  7. There is a ton of things that can make a classroom feel very welcoming. I loved yesterdays class how we started introducing ourselves and Dr Jones picked up everyones name in a matter of seconds. I think the way we treat each other and the need to respect other peoples opinions will go a long way. To me a classroom starts going down hill when there is no student teacher interaction. The classes that a professor makes its fun makes its more enjoyable the more your students want to go to your class to enjoy it. The phrase Education means filling your brain with information is totally false. When you learn something its not just listening it in and writing it down its actually try to process what there saying, really think about the point that someone is trying to put across. I look forward to the next class meeting.

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  8. Hello, how is everybody ? Walking into class yesterday I was tired but as the class continued I became very focused and interested. So I can say the first day was a interesting observant experience. I am not used to walking into a classroom and being greeted right away from the teacher. Dr. Jones showed respect, happiness and welcomed everyone ! Dr. Jones made the class greet each other so we could all come together. Me and other classmates were nervous, and some was calm but we felt comfortability to express ourselves and our thoughts of what we need to strive in the classroom.
    Coming together in group work having conversations, presenting our new ideas without criticism, helping each other when needed and keeping a friendly and respected environment are ways the class can proceed in a helpful, and understanding environment.

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  9. It doesn’t matter if your a smart student or good student it is always okay to ask for help. Everyone has strong areas about a certain subject and others may have other strong areas. Everyone has a weakness that could always be improved and if your not asking questions that area of improvement that you need will never get better because you are still not understanding the topic and asking for help will help you understand that area of difficulties more clearly.

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  10. Hey guys! When Doctor J asked for my name and remembered it by the second time we spoke really suprised me because my name is hard to pronounce or remember. Because she learned almost every persons name in the classroom it pushed me to do the same. when you remember someones name it can make the classroom environment more comfortable. Most of the time when youre in a classroom environment and you dont know the students name, you are less likely to be interactive with your classmates. Im not really a shy person, so I ask alot of questions. I do this because I know there are students who may be too afraid or shy to ask.
    I do not agree with the statements above. I feel like you will not learn anything if you did not take something from that class and apply it to your life or future. Any student will ask for help whether theyre struggling or striving because questions are for clarifications.

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  11. Hello everyone. I guess its my turn to take a “stab” at this. I must say that I have to agree with a few of the other posters/classmates in saying that my first experience with this class was interesting and different. This preliminary experience is what answers the first question of this assignment in regards to what makes a classroom environment welcoming. I love the fact that Dr. Jones refers to herself as Dr. J. It makes me feel a bit more connected to her in a way that more than just a student in class to receive a grade, but that I am going to learn this semester and peak my interest. Just from the initial interactions in class, I feel what makes a classroom environment welcoming is exactly what we have – a feeling of responsibility for ourselves and each other as we learn, complimented with the ability to confidently express our ideas.

    I find it so interesting that Dr. J has specified to not answer all of the questions that are posted – this is unusual for me because from other classes I’ve taken with a discussion part, professors dock for unanswered parts of questions/posts and for deviating away from the tasks. Its honestly kind of hard to wrap my head around the idea that we can be allowed to take this discussion as well – a discussion – to not feel limited about what we can “talk” about whether its “related” or “unrelated”. This is new to me, but again, makes me feel a bit more relaxed – and I feel I can actually learn when I’m comfortable and not stressed out.

    Although I want to answer more questions posted I will end by saying I do think that “good” and “smart” students DO ask for help and I think that the way Dr. J has our class set up, asking for help would be an easy, un-embarrassing task – which in turns means there’s no excuse for us to not be good and smart students!

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  12. To make a classroom (or online) environment welcoming for me would be respect. Everyone wants and needs to be respect. I’ve always remembered the golden rule: “Treat others the way you want to be treated.” Something that we can do in this class to make it as positive and effective way of learning would be befriending and communicating more often with everyone in the class regardless of color, race, religion, gender identity, etc. Another benefit for everyone in the class would be helping one another when someone is struggling with any assignment. All of us should build each other up and encourage each other to do our best in this class.

    The incentives, besides good grades, that all of us can receive in class would be knowledge, new friendships, and simply a moment of enjoyment in this life time. If we interact with each other more often, we can create a relationship. Furthermore, when we create a stronger bond with one another in class, we can create a positive and welcoming vibe for everyone. Our class can become a place where everyone is comfortable sharing their thoughts and ideas without feeling shy or ashamed. Things that cannot be graded would be someone’s belief, gender, opinion, identity, and race. The things mentioned above cannot be graded because that is what makes that individual him/her. All of us are unique. And it is not fair if our grades are based upon who we are as an individual.

    Earning a good grade means that you know a lot about a subject

    This statement isn’t necessarily true because some students might just have memorized the answers in their minds but cannot explain why that is the answer. Or in the worst case scenario would be that student cheated off from another student who knows a lot about that subject.

    If an instructor teaches an idea, that means that students have learned it

    This is untrue for some students because everyone’s learning ability is different. Some people are more of a visual learner who has to see a model to learn the subject. While some students need to read a manual, for example, in order to understand the subject.

    Education means filling your brain with information

    This isn’t a fact because the purpose of education is to teach students how to solve real world problems. Hence, all of us put the information from our brain into practice.

    “Good” students or “smart” students don’t ask for help

    This is a lie. In fact, smart people are the ones who question about a lot of things. People like those want to understand the subject in depth.

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  13. Hello everyone. The thing that made me feel welcome was the introduction that we had in the classroom because not in many classes you have the opportunity to have an introduction. I would say that I enjoyed the group activity because we got to interact with each other and share our points of view. I think that working with a group is important and that could bring communication. I would say that getting a good grade means you are trying. It’s a very interesting question because some students are just taking classes with no knowledge of the course (because they need it) or they want to try to something new and they enjoy it, but it becomes difficult for them, so people will try to get a good a grade. I’m sure everyone has their own opinion about the question.

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  14. What makes a classroom welcoming is a sense of community within the students as well as the instructor. A sense of community can only be established if there’s some type of familiarity within each person in the class. When Dr. Jones individually introduced herself to each person in the class and asked for our name in return, that was the first feeling of welcoming in the class. Not only that, but she also remembered the name of every single person in the class, something I’ve never seen any teacher do in my time as a student anywhere. This unique start to the class was certainly very welcoming and something that will set the standard for me when I think about how welcoming a future class should be.
    Besides grades, the only incentive I believe a person can have in a class to do well, is if they really enjoy the class. Music is something that can bring many people together, so I believe that along with the welcoming environment that was already created within the class, the topic of the class itself will be a very positive learning experience for myself as well as my fellow students, which is good incentive for this class besides grades.

    There are many myths and misconceptions when it comes to learning. One of the myths that have caught my eye as extremely inaccurate is that “good” and “smart” students don’t ask any questions. On the contrary, from my personal experience as a student, I’ve always noticed that the more exceptional students always ask the most questions because they indulge them self fully into the curriculum of a class and are always eager to learn and understand more.

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  15. What incentives are there besides grades? Well, beside my grades some thing that really incentives me is remember what I’m getting out of this if I finish this or just thinking about where am trying to be in the next 4 years are so in order is really push myself more. What kinds of feedback can you receive that isn’t a grade? Some kinds of feedback that I can receive that isn’t a grade is conference with the student, sometimes to revision and/or rewrite to things that you have done. Just to make it better. What sorts of things can’t be graded? The sorts of things that can not be graded is works that are not really done by you.

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  16. Earning good grade means that you know a lot about a subject

    I don’t believe this to be true. There are many people that will memorize whatever subject they are taking for their tests. But what happens later? What does anyone really remember after the test is done. I can say this with certainty. I have myself done that for a class, just to get through it and pass. Not one of my favorite subjects of course. But I have also listened and tried to take what I have learned with me. To take what was passed on to me and use it in my everyday life.

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  17. Honestly, when I first heard about this class I thought it was going to a boring class about old music. But after being in Dr. J class it changes my way of thinking about her class and maybe being one of my favorite classes so far this semester. I like how the way she teaches and how open she is about the topics and how the students can interact with them. Also, I like how we do group deductions to and compare each group on how they are thinking. Lastly having the students creating their own play we can hear all types of genres of music that people listen to.

    I don’t agree with “Good” students or smart students don’t ask for help. The reason why I believe that is because no matter how good or smart you are you’re always gonna need help with an obstacle blocking your way. Even the smartest people in the world, pass, and present, needed help at some point in their life to be where they are.

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  18. Hello my fellow classmates!

    What sorts of things make a classroom (or online) environment welcoming for you?
    -To me, a welcoming classroom environment means being able to be comfortable and genuine with the professor and classmates, but at the same time be respectful with one another. The first class we had was very interesting because it wasn’t a typical first day of class where the professor starts the lecture right away. Instead, we learned everyone’s names and how we were feeling. That activity alone made me feel very welcomed and it made me feel like the professor wanted us to be there and enlighten us.

    What can we together do in this class to make it as positive and effective a space as possible? Let’s define our standards as a community for how we want to treat each other and also share tips or techniques for doing well in a class.
    -In my opinion, to make the class a positive and effective space is simple: be respectful to one another. It’s important to share your own ideas but it is more important to be open minded when other classmates are sharing his or her ideas.

    What incentives are there besides grades? What kinds of feedback can you receive that isn’t a grade? What sorts of things can’t be graded?
    -Besides grades, another obvious incentive is to learn. Being enlightened and learning new things is priceless and can help us change the way we think for the better.

    Finally, there are several myths or misconceptions about learning. Each of the following is a statement which is untrue. What examples or explanations can you offer for why they are inaccurate or false?

    Earning good grade means that you know a lot about a subject
    -I can literally just study right before a test, remember all of it, do well on the test, and forget the entire subject right away. To know a lot about a subject means to be able to take something from it and be able to remember it in the future when necessary.

    If an instructor teaches an idea, that means that students have learned it
    -An instructor can teach an idea but the student needs to learn the who, what, when, where, why of that idea. An instructor can teach an idea that he or she is not even strong about. The student would also not be so interested in it either. Therefore the student is not learning it, but rather just listening and forgetting.

    Education means filling your brain with information
    “Good” students or “smart” students don’t ask for help
    -The definition of a “good” and “smart” student means a student that does everything in his or her power to succeed. If that includes asking for help, they would still be considered a good and smart student. I consider myself a good student and I ask for help all the time ^_^.

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  19. “Good” students or “smart” students don’t ask for help
    I would disagree with this statement, I would believe it is the opposite. I think what make a “good” student is someone who has a lot of questions because they would want to expand on their knowledge on something. Also I would add that a “good” or a “smart” student would want to collaborate with other student to get their perspective on a topic. Another thing that I would want to add is that it is okay to ask for help,we are all human and we are not perfect something we do need help. These are some reason on why i disagree with this statement.

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  20. I feel that in order to feel welcome in a classroom and make the time spent in the class productive, communication and open discussions are most necessary. It is important to maintain a respectful environment where other people’s ideas, although we may not always agree with them, can be accepted without backlash or harmful criticism. There are certain situations where a class discussion goes off topic and can become a teachable moment. The values that we inherit from this class and teachable moments can not be graded and in my opinion, is far more important than any grade and that any feedback should build you up and improve your skill and not be critical or degrading.

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  21. I have always strongly disagreed with the statement that “if an instructor teaches an idea, that means the student has learned it”. All people comprehend content at different paces and perceive solutions to problems from all types of different perspectives. Growing up, math was and still is my weakest subject and when a teacher would shake his or her head in disappointment with the following words “I can’t believe you still don’t know this when we went over this in class”, I would always want to yell out and remind them that it doesn’t mean we understand it. It is discouraging to hear those words and that is why I frown upon the notion of there only being one right answer to certain questions and that memorizing ideas makes you smart because to me, there are different types of smart. You may be knowledgable in one category but there is always someone who will know more than you in another and that is why it is about learning. An A+ does in no way insinuate that you are generally “smart” in every aspect of life academically or socially.

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  22. The first thing that stuck to me when reading the questions is the misconception of “Earning a good grade means that you know a lot about a subject”. I feel like that is the most important one of those just because of how untrue it is. A lot goes into getting a good or bad grade, such as getting a good grade depends largely on how the instructor believes is the correct way of teaching a subject as well as how they perceive their grade system should be. I’ve had classmates who know way more about the subject than me yet don’t feel the need to try or force themselves to go do the extra mile for a good grade. I have always believed theirs two different ways of thinking that could intertwine but sometimes don’t and its being book smart and “street” smart. What I have always believed book smart to be is literally that, whatever material they are given they are able to gear themselves to get the best possible grade out of whatever they are doing. While “street” smart means they are learning through experience for example you can study up and down the machinery in a construction site yet you will never learn to use it if you have zero experience with it. So no, just because someone earned a better grade than the next person doesn’t mean they retained any of the information in the long run or know more of the subject than the person with a lower grade.

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  23. In addition to grades, I think there are other ways to motivate me.For example, when I put forward a certain point of view, or when I put forward my opinion on a certain thing, the teacher agrees with my opinion. This can motivate me to like this subject more and study harder.This is an incentive other than grades. Good students and good result, also need to ask questions, because good students also need to learn. They ask questions and solve the problem, which makes them become a good student. Learning is endless, so good students don’t need to ask questions is wrong. On the contrary, they need to come up with more questions, to keep them is “good” student

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  24. Empathy. If most of my classmates realize that we are in the same place at the same time doing the same thing than ego and insecurities will probably get washed away and we will be able to communicate with one another much better. It will make the environment feel more like a club than a college class. Grades will take a backseat and developing a camaraderie will be much more important. Don’t ya think?

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  25. Ed-ju-kay-shun. Ever met a person who prides themselves on their ed-ju-kay-shun.
    They carry it around like some sort of accessory for you just to go absolutely ga-ga for it when they say something “smart”. I know there’s a difference between being ed-ju-kay-tid and being in-tell-la-gint…..the difference is nothing. Teachers throw information at you like feces expecting you to catch it and fill your brain with it. Life throws learning experiences at you like feces expecting you to catch it and fill your brain with it. I believe in instincts. BUT Many people don’t follow those due to institutions and low self esteem, oppression etc. BUT then again we have no “choice” were in the system already. So the “best” thing to do is to pretend…like we have been doing and be selective with our feces that we catch and fill our brian with …because life IS filling your brain with information. The world around you is already a ton of information that you digest everyday.

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  26. In my opinion, what makes a class environment welcoming is when there is respect and communication. Nowadays I feel like those two concepts is what makes people go through a day. I walked in the other day extremely late due to not finding a spot, and usually I hate being the center of attention when I walk into class late. In this class it wasn’t like that, the professor made it extremely welcoming and I didn’t feel like the odd one out. The one statement I chose is, “Earning good grades means that you know a lot about a subject”. I personally believe that if you pay attention in any class and do all homework and studies, you will earn good grades. I didn’t know much about Earth Science back in high school, but I just kept coming to class and studying and It was an easy 85 grade. If you can find the right motivation for anything in life, then you will achieve it. Same with the “good students don’t ask for help”, nothing ever wrong with help. When you receive another persons help or opinion, it gives you their point of view on it which can help you determine if you want to change it .

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  27. I’ve procrastinated until the last day to make a blog post, but here we go. I liked how we had icebreakers and group work, it made the first day feel more immersive. I prefer these types of class settings rather than other classes I’ve had that were 3 hour straight lectures with no student engagement. Ugh, that makes me pull my curly hair from boredom. Anyways, I disagree with the statement “Education means filling your brain with information.” It’s not about filling your brain, it’s about retaining the information you receive.I used to think it was lame to get good grades and was a teenage burnout, but I’ve changed things around and getting steady 4.0’s. It’s not about sitting in a lecture and having information come out on ear and out another, retain it with studying and good scholarly habits. I also disagree with “good or smart students don’t need help. Nobodies perfect, if you ever need help, ask for it! Let’s all get this 4.0 in Music 101 people!. =)

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  28. What sorts of things make a classroom (or online) environment welcoming for you? What can we together do in this class to make it as positive and effective a space as possible?

    What i believe to make a classroom environment welcoming and have a positive and effective space is communication and respect to each peer. Its like what we did in class how we got to know each others name and communicate to each other to get a feel of what kind people we are. And how everyone was honest about how some people were excited, nervous and anxious for the class. It made the atmosphere in the room change knowing that their might be other people in class feeling the same way.

    Earning good grade means that you know a lot about a subject
    If an instructor teaches an idea, that means that students have learned it
    Education means filling your brain with information

    Has for these i can answer them with just experience in one of my semester for college i had taken Italian 101 I had gotten a B and to be honest I didn’t learn anything or remember anything from that class, before a test I just reviewed what we did in class and that all so these three statements are inaccurate in my opinion.

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  29. Several things that make a classroom environment welcoming for me is being able to freely share my opinions and have open discussions with my classmates. to make this class a positive experience for everyone, I think it would be best if we all respect each other’s ideas and opinions and give people the space to share how they feel without judgment.

    Incentives for this class besides grades would be how you effectively communicate with others within a discussion and participation during class hours and on online discussions. The feedbacks that we could possibly receive that isn’t a grade could be based on how we treat our fellow classmates.

    For the last exercise, all of these statements are false to me because they are all generalized or stereotyped ideas within education. For example, the first statement says “earning a good grade means you know a lot about a subject”. that is false only because there are a lot of classes I’ve taken in college where I’ve only memorized information and didn’t necessarily retain it and was able to get a good grade in the class, but I don’t remember half of the information i “learned” in some of these classes.

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  30. I think that just because you’re getting good grades does not mean you know the subject. Knowing the subject means you can teach the subject and be able to apply what you learned.

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  31. no need to make the environment of a classroom more welcome. this is a place to learning not a place for party.
    I’m just kidding no one will see my reply anyway 🙂

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  32. Good evening everyone. In my opinion, something that makes a classroom (or online) environment welcoming for me is attitudes. What I mean by that is that a teacher’s attitude definitely impacts the environment of the classroom and subsequently a student’s performance. I use my first two days of this Spring 2020 semester as an example. Dr. Jones’ classroom seems to be a very positive environment. She appears to be very friendly and seems to actually care about her students education. This is a stark contrast to my biology teacher who has such a hideous attitude for no reason. I had her class once so far and I already dread going back this week. That just goes to show you how attitudes can make an environment welcoming.
    I have personal experience that debunks the myth that “earning good grades means that you know a lot about a subject”. I ended up with an A for MA 121 and I can assure you I know absolutely nothing about college trigonometry. Well I’m sure I know something but definitely not as much as I should for someone who received an A. A lot of students cram information but aren’t actually learning anything. They’re simply trying to pass.

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