This discussion post is concerned with the question, “What role does the listener play in creating music?” How do you think the issues raised in this post are going to change based on how our lives have already been upended in 2020?

The approximate reading time of this post is 8 minutes, not counting any audio media.

Let’s begin

Listen:

Billy Pilgrim has come unstuck in time.

Billy has gone to sleep a senile widower and awakened on his wedding day. He has walked through a door in 1955 and come out another one in 1941. He has gone back through that door to find himself in 1963. He has seen his birth and death many times, he says, and pays random visits to all the events in between.

He says.

Billy is spastic in time, has no control over where he is going next, and the trips aren’t necessarily fun. He is in a constant state of stage fright, he says, because he never knows what part of his life he is going to have to act in next.

—Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughter-House Five (1972)

When are we now?

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, K. 525, I. Allegro (1787)

If I asked you when you are as you listen to this piece of music, you’d likely say (after looking at me quizzically) that, of course, you’re listening to it right now (approximately sometime in April 2020).

orbit

There’s the experience right now of listening to the music, but is that the only place you are?

Listening to a piece of music can remind you of past experiences: places you’ve been, people you’ve been with when you heard that piece previously, or other pieces of music you’ve heard. Part of your brain is somewhere else—perhaps it’s more accurate to say that your brain is somewhen else. As you exist in the present, you’re also mentally in another time.

These additional sensations, memories, and times that a piece of music conjures up for you define your personal listening experience—the piece of music is a nucleus around which all these other ideas come into orbit. How varied, rich, deep, or extensive that orbit is for you is a big factor in how meaningful a piece of music seems to be.

Multiple simultaneous orbits

triangle

A piece of music needs three kinds of people in order to exist: a creator, an executor, and an auditor—in more common terms, a composer, a performer, and a listener (or in even more pop-friendly terms, a songwriter/producer, a singer, and an audience). Notice that I said three kinds of people, not three different people: they could all be the same person! You as an individual could come up with a musical idea right now (create), sing or hum or tap it (execute), with no one around to hear it but you (audit).

It’s also possible for the three people in this triangle to exist in different points in time: a piece of music might be created by a composer in 1725, played by a performer in 1985, and listened to by you in 2020—time travel! And each person involved, because they’re existing at different points in time, brings different ideas, different purposes, different intentions, and different concerns to the piece—they’re experiencing a completely different orbit or constellation set in motion by the piece of music.

Here’s the flutist Jean-Pierre Rampal performing Johann Sebastian Bach’s Flute Sonata in E minor, BWV 1034, III. Andante. The work was composed around the year 1725 and recorded in 1985:

The composer—Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)— might have been thinking about his contractual obligations and pleasing his employer, or an aspect of his compositional technique, or his devotion to God.

rampal
Jean-Pierre Rampal

The flutist in this recording, Jean-Pierre Rampal (1922-2000), had a different set of purposes: creating superlatively beautiful sound at all times, playing in a style that people wanted to hear in 1985, and continuing his ongoing project of recording every single piece of music written for the flute in an effort to raise the profile of the instrument (which had been largely ignored since the 19th century in favor of the piano and violin).

And neither of their concerns would be same as those, say, of a parent at their child’s recital playing this piece for the first time: “I can’t believe I’m paying all this money for lessons and Junior can barely hold his flute up,” or “Wow, I’ve got a great shot here for the video,” or “Ugh, classical music is boring but they say it’s good for my kid’s brain or something.”

As your knowledge of music and music history broadens, you become able to bring a greater range of understanding, depth, and nuance to your listening experience—the orbit set in motion by a piece of music. Your listening experience will entail the sounds you hear, your personal or emotional reactions, as well as some time travel: to the time when the piece was written and to the time when the piece was performed. The more you know about the thoughts, life, concerns, or intentions of the composer (and the performer!) and his/her time period, the more layers in your understanding of the piece.

Historical performance practice

Not only do compositional styles change (e.g., Baroque to Classical), but so do performance styles. The way in which people produce musical sounds, behave on stage, or program concerts has changed significantly over time as tastes change, new ideas come to light, and the technology of music (instrument production, amplification, distribution media) evolve.

In the classical music world, it was common practice in the 20th century for a performer to use the same performance style for a Baroque piece (written ca. 1600-1750), a Romantic piece (from the 19th century), and a modern piece. But in the 1970s, classical musicians began to think more consciously about one particular aspect of this time travel and asked themselves: would it be possible to perform musical sounds in a manner closer to a composer’s intentions—to go back in time and come away with a more “authentic” performance style closer to that of the period when the music was written? Were there aspects of a musical experience that could be brought to life that an ahistorical style would gloss over?

The historical performance practice movement rests on research done by hundreds of musicians (musicologists and performer-scholars) and brought to life in performances: re-reading historical documents such as instructional treatises (such as those by Johann Joachim Quantz and Leopold Mozart), music criticism, and first-hand audience accounts; iconography (the study of images, which we’ve done in class!); and taking contemporary philosophy into account. The historical performance practice movement also tends to use period instruments or modern re-creations of period instruments. So, for a piece written in 1725, a flutist would play on a wooden, keyless instrument used that time, rather than the metal, multi-keyed flute developed in the mid-19th century.

flutes-comparison
A modern flute (top) and a modern replica of a keyless wooden Baroque flute (bottom)
kuijken
Barthold Kuijken

Here’s a recording of flutist Barthold Kuijken (b. 1949) performing the same Bach flute sonata and doing so on a period-appropriate instrument:

There are period keyboards, bows, horns, and vocal techniques, too, and playing on older instruments allows the musicians to time travel and immerse themselves in the techniques of the past, and the sounds they make create a more vivid historical experience for the listener.

At first, “serious” classical musicians scoffed at the early music movement, saying that only musicians who weren’t good enough to be successful were trying to play in a historically-informed manner. And then many started noticing how much more of the music came to life when played in a historically informed style. Now there are a significant number of professional ensembles (Anonymous 4The Hilliard Ensemble, New York PolyphonyPraetorius, The Tallis Scholars), concert series and festivals (GEMS, Amherst Early Music Festival), and degree programs in conservatories or music schools (Juilliard, Yale) devoted to historically informed music making.

Musicking

To bring this full circle, let’s return to the idea of where you go when you listen to a piece of music and why the listening experience is so important to the meaning of music.

Christopher Small (1927-2011) was a musicologist (a person who studies music and its role in society) whose work grew out of his discomfort with the way we typically talk about music: we talk in a way that suggests that music is an object, a thing that is already done (i.e., made by a musician), and we listeners just sit back and have no role in making it. We do this when we say things like “The music is sad” (as if its emotional content is independent of how we listen to it), or “She performed the song” (which implies that what the performer does on stage or on a record is different from the song itself).

But wait!

Didn’t we just think about the idea that each of has a rich, varied listening experience, one set in motion by a musical experience but whose trajectory and scope is defined by us, the listener, and what we bring to the table?

To this end, Small coined a new term: “musicking.” Musicking is a progressive-tense verb (like running, evolving, becoming, doing) that implies a kind of ongoing action. In his mind, music isn’t a thing at all:

Musicking: To music is to take part, in any capacity, in a musical performance, whether by performing, by listening, by rehearsing or practicing, by providing material for performance (what is called composing), or by dancing. We might at times even extend its meaning to what the person is doing who takes the tickets at the door or the hefty men who shift the piano and the drums or the roadies who set up the instruments and carry out the sound checks or the cleaners who clean up after everyone else has gone. They, too, are all contributing to the nature of the event that is a musical performance… [To] pay attention in any way to a musical performance, including a recorded performance, even to Muzak in an elevator, is to music… [The] verb to music… covers all participation in a musical performance, whether it takes place actively or passively, whether we like the way it happens or whether we do not, whether we consider it interesting or boring, constructive or destructive, sympathetic or antipathetic… Value judgments come later, if they come at all. (Christopher Small, Musicking: The Meanings of Performing and Listening, 1998; p. 9)

Part of the reason Small coined this term (coming up with a new word is called a neologism), is that thinking of music as a “thing” or an “object” doesn’t let us appreciate music as it’s being made, only as a thing which has been made. However, music is just a means to create an opportunity to do something and to do something with other people. In other words, musicking creates relationships between people:

The act of musicking establishes in the place where it is happening a set of relationships, and it is in those relationships that the meaning of the act lies. They are to be found not only between those organized sounds which are conventionally thought of as being the stuff of musical meaning but also between the people who are taking part, in whatever capacity, in the performance. (Ibid, p. 13)

Our job as listeners is to forge those relationships: to engage, whether physically, socially, or intellectually, with the sounds we hear, the people making them, and the people around us who are also listening/participating. So, Small says that music is an action, one in which we should all take part:

The fundamental nature and meaning of music lie not in objects, not in musical works at all, but in action, in what people do. It is only by understanding what people do as they take part in a musical act that we can hope to understand its nature and the function it fulfills in human life. Whatever that function may be, I am certain, first, that to take part in a music act is of central importance to our very humanness, as important as taking part in the act of speech… If that is so, then our present-day concert life, whether “classical” or “popular,” in which the “talented” few are empowered to produce music for the “untalented” majority, is based on a falsehood. It means that our powers of making music for ourselves have been hijacked and the majority of people robbed of the musicality that is theirs by right of birth, while a few stars, and their handlers, grow rich and famous through selling us what we have been led to believe we lack. (Ibid, pp. 8-9)

In light of Small’s argument, we, the listeners, have an important role to play when it comes to “making music.” He says that “musicking… is an activity in which all those present are involved and for whose nature and quality, success or failure, everyone present bears some responsibility” (Ibid, p. 10)

Time travel: the future!

There’s also a composer-performer-listener triangle that’s oriented towards the future: what will happen next in the world of music, and how do we shape that future? Here’s a 2010 New York Times article from the newspaper’s music critic Allan Kozinn dealing with this very issue: 2010.12.28 Kozinn – Searching New Music For Keepers

Final thoughts

I think of the listening experience simultaneously as something that is social—listening to sounds made or conceived by another person, often with other people, and contemplating other people’s perspectives or ideas—but also solitary—no one can ever have the same listening experience as you, because they won’t have your exact knowledge, share your past experiences, be in your body, or pay attention to the same things. Bridging the gap between the solitary and the social rests on our ability to articulate what it is that we think, experience, and why: sharing in words the richness of our listening experience with others.

-Dr. J.

67 thoughts on “Musicking (Online discussion Apr 13-19)

  1. This was a very interesting read. I never thought of how I contribute to music other than to listening to it. This has broadened my view on what we all bring to the table in terms of music. Music has always been fascinating to me, because of what I was listening to, not about how it was being made and how many hands had a role in creating music; at least not until this class. I would never have thought that just listening to music has a part in making music. This has left me with a lot to think about. What really is my role in music? Does what I listen to have a role in the music that will be played in the future? I know they have people out there auditing music sales on pop stars and bands. Does that also impact what we will listen to in the future? I guess, if I enjoyed the music and then recommended it to someone else, that would be my role in musicking.

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    1. I totally agree with you ionandrea, our roles in music literally determines if the music hits or flops. I would even go on to say that listeners play an even bigger role than you think, considering how people can make a artist who was not in the music game become popular overnight because millions of people start listening to that song. For example 6ix9ine, who got famous of his song Gummo and became a known rapper literally overnight. Or pop smoke (R.I.P) who became famous in NY and eventually known throughout the world for his song welcome to the party. It’s crazy how much power listeners have, and your audience can determine your music career based on if they like your music or not.

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      1. That is the realization I came to reading this. It is amazing that in one night someone who was unknown becomes a star. Just like that, because of one song. The negative also is that one hit wonder. The pressure to continue making songs like that for their listeners must be incredible.

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        1. “no one can ever have the same listening experience as you, because they won’t have your exact knowledge” This is the perfect example because in the eyes of a lot of consumers things like “overnight” or “one night” are used very loosely. When in reality one hit song doesn’t make you a star because in the eyes of the music business, it just means more eyes are on you and you can make more money for them. Public perception changes. Theres a deeper topic here to speak about and that is that people feel the need to be popular or have a popular something to feel like a “star” or be perceived as a “star”.

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        2. I agree with how the pressure can accumulate but this should be used as fuel to continue your career in music since your name is relevant still

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    2. Hey ioanandrea, yes this was a very interesting discussion to read about. I agree with you when you say that listening to music has a part in making music When I’m listening to music can benefit overall well-being.

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    3. After reading the articles and your response I definitely think that what we listen determines the music of the future, the trend is already starting with the mediocre mumble rappers. They’ve gotten traction and it feels likes a new one becomes famous every week.

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    4. I agree. I found the part about how listening to music, plays a role in making music interesting as well.

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  2. Good day everyone! Hope everyone had a great Easter. This topic is especially relevant in todays times ( this epidemic) because music has become a way to unite many people all around the world in these times of crisis. Jus think about the many challenges developed now a days (don’t rush challenge, fliptheswitch challenge, renegade challenge ext.) that has become a part of our daily lives. These challenges are associated by music by different artist, actually these challenges literally uses one viral music and that is the song used in the challenge. This is what Musicking is, where thousands of people all around the world are taking part in actively listening to a song. I will even expand this further and say musicking can actually bring listeners together as one and allow us to share something in common, our passion for the song. So our roles as listeners is actually extremely important

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    1. Hi Widnie, i agree with you, in this time, artists and musicians have developed a huge popularity in social media and all challenges involved music. I think is very accurate your statement about musicking bringing listeners together and allow them to share something in common. I would say is a great comparation and use of the word

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  3. I want to ask you guys a question as the listeners concerning recent artist that are becoming sensational overnight. A lot of older generation artist who where in the rap game or music industry for a long time do not like some of the new coming rappers. They feel as though these artist are not working as hard to make their way to the top, and therefore not having respect for the older generation rappers and artist who really paved the way for them. What do you guys think? do you feel as though this is true? or do you disagree and think it’s foolishness?

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    1. I don’t know much about the rappers today. The old timers should be proud for all the things they did to pave the way for the new rappers coming in. I wouldn’t begrudge them their success just because they didn’t have to sacrifice or struggle as much. That is what life is all about. We all play a part in whatever the struggle so that the next generation doesn’t have to struggle like we did.

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    2. Hey Widnie I do agree on that comment that older rappers feel as though these artist are not working as hard to make their way to the top. I do believe that is true older generation rappers feel like those one hit wonder rappers wouldn’t exist back then that they worked so much harder that the rappers today. This is a great point.

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      1. I can both agree and disagree. Of course there is always respect for the older generations of musicians who have paved the way for the up and coming. However, who’s to say anyone worked harder than anyone else? If you are truly someone who is interested in rap and hip hop, then you will go out of your way to learn about not only the one hit wonders and up, up and coming, and established artists but about the history of rap and hip hope and the emcees that paved the way for the genre. Thats not to say that when I hear the mumbles of a new rapper on the radio that I enjoy it, but everyone deserves credit where due. Some more than others, but I don’t think it’s for anyone to say how much respect someone deserves when we truly don’t know how hard it was for everyone involved.

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        1. I agree with you Isabelle. I would also like to add that sometimes people create things just because they themselves find it meaningful and have an outlet to share their creation. This was a very interesting idea you brought up

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    3. I think it’s true, and why foolishness of such saying. From the older times, there wasn`t much-advanced technology unlike now where there is easy access to media, such as Spotify, Youtube, TikTok, etc, where one upload could be viewed, resend, reload, spread to millions in just a few hours to days. And just like that fame comes knocking at there door. As opposed to the older generation where technology wasn’t advanced and the spread to the broad media community isn`t as easy. You would need to either work hard or be unique, gifted enough to gain recognition from a producer that favor your talent, you would have to work to get your CDs out to the crowd, climbing stairs by stairs to the top of the music industry. Its hard work, it could take years for the community to recognize an artist then, they deserve their fame with such accomplishment. Not saying the artistes now ain`t doing any of that, but its not as complex nor troublesome like then.

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    4. Times have changed and they got to let new people shine in this world. If they dont like it, no one is forcing them to listen there is many other artist that may fit their liking,

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  4. I found it interesting that athree people in the triangle can exist in different times. Also I found the idea of musicking to be very intriguing . I didn’t know what it was before this and it sounds very cool

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    1. Yes the triangle sort of reminds me of the “illuminati” hand signs that a lot of performers put up but thats neither here nor there but the idea of musicking is very interesting

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    2. Hey jkatz, I would have to agree with you when you say that three people in the triangle because a piece of music needs three kinds of people with a creator, an executor, and an auditor. Music is really interesting, you can learn something new everyday.

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  5. Hey guys! This was a very great discussion to read. A part of the discussion I found interesting was that Listening to a piece of music can remind you of past experiences and times that a piece of music conjures up for you define your personal listening experience. When listening to a piece of music can remind you of past experiences.I didn’t really know what musicking was that but now I’m glad to find out what it was about.

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  6. In my opinion the term musicking is something that I always believed in. Just because you don’t make music or don’t feel like you’re a “creative” person to make it, just by listening your contributing something. Just by tapping your foot, your contributing something. Just by saying “hey check this song out by ____”, you are contributing. Each and everyone of us is shaping our musical realm because you can say “ahh I don’t like that song” or “ahh who listens to that” your shaping your reality and when you do that you might effect others realities BUT judgements or critiques are last because you still contributed something by listening to it or not listening to it. so jokes on you.

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    1. I totally agree with this point even if you don’t create music just by listening to someone else is music is still something good to contribute. This comment is perfect said it doesn’t matter if you don’t like it just by listening to it is something good.

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  7. This reading is very interesting and got me thinking a lot. The word Musicking is very interesting it means everyone that takes part of it even going to the extent of even the people that take your tickets at the door are involved.Everyone is contributing to the nature of the event that is a musical performance. What does everyone else think on the word Musicking ?

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    1. I believe that the feedback we give to musical performers is very important. Just by listening we can help an artist create even better music that more people will enjoy. Constructive criticism is the best way to help improve the music quality.

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  8. I never thought of listening to music, dancing, or even sharing my thoughts and past experiences about music as being an active participant in music. If you look at the broader picture it completely makes sense because I would think that a majority of music artists make music, sometimes on their own and sometimes with others, that music is being made for others to hear. So of course not only is the music maker and active participant in the music, but so is the listener, dancer, and anyone even having a simple conversation about piece. I found this reading to be really interesting, particularly Small’s ideology on musicking. What did you guys think or does anyone disagree?

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  9. Honestly, it is common sense that everybody influences music in their own ways. We, the listeners, determine whether a song can go viral or not, whether it becomes a big hit or not. However, we never think about that, we just enjoy and that is cool. We are basically the gate keepers of whether a musician becomes successful or not.

    Recently, but not so recently, I was watching a YouTube video, where the person speaking was addressing Justin Bieber and his actions. It was very uncomfortable to watch. He published his latest single, Yummy, whether it is a good song or not, it doesn’t matter. He was promoting it in every way he could think of, which is natural. However, it was disturbing how he was acting when going on Instagram live with his fans. He was basically disregarding everything they said, which they were just telling him how much they loved him and how it was a dream to be talking to him, and all that would come out of his mouth was, “did you buy the song on iTunes?” and something about Spotify, don’t really remember. It was very disturbing. Hopefully, this doesn’t happen again, where musicians know that the listeners are the ones who get them success so they try to manipulate them into doing it.

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  10. Hi everyone i would have never noticed the impact i made in music thats other listening to it. It helped me realize the whole spectrum of what goes into the world of musical expression. The most amazing thing is that you unknowingly contribute to the creation of music just by listening to it, you never expect that you hsve anything to do with what music your favorite artist putting out. What are some other way i unknowingly shape the music that is created?

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  11. I love music. I love that it exists, and that we can enjoy it as human beings. Somehow through this gift of nature, we’re able to express emotions through performing, creating, or listening to music. It’s fascinating that people from different times can be connected to one another through this ethereal medium. I hope that music sticks around and that future audiences can be just as moved by sounds as we can be in the current day and age.

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  12. Hi guys, as many of you I did not know how much i contribute to music other than playing it and listening to it. This week’s discussion is interesting because is about something i never pay attention to it or even have a thought about it. Musicking is a new word to me and is impressive how gives a significant meaning to everyone involved in the process of creating music.
    I liked the part where it says “is that thinking of music as a “thing” or an “object” doesn’t let us appreciate music as it’s being made”. this statement just change my perception of music as an object and more like something we all produce by the diferent contributions and meanings we give to it.

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  13. “a piece of music might be created by a composer in 1725, played by a performer in 1985, and listened to by you in 2020—time travel!” If there was anything that really stood out, it would be this. Literally blew my mind after reading that line. I don’t know about the rest of you but being able to experience a part of history is a feeling like no other. Music is probably the easiest way because it is transformative and could send your imagination back in time luggage with emotion and excitement all at once.

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  14. This discussion was interesting to me because I came to the realization that people make music and they need that feedback from other people to see where they can improve on . People are entitled to their own opinions so what one person may think is cool another person may think sounds odd which is fine . That’s why things like YouTube exist now and the like and dislike button and views by a certain time can help an artist figure out if the content they are putting out is liked by others . I noticed now a days that old music will always play a part in new music as it is often re vamped with a new twist by an newer or upcoming artist . Pop smoke Putting his twist on 50 cent music for example is a perfect example as 50 cent supported him doing it . At the end of the day the people listening to the music has the power to determine wether or not the content these artists produce become successful or not because if we don’t have that power then who does ?

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  15. Music can definitely be something social! Many musicians make music to express themselves. There are many people who make music to specifically express their opinions on certain issues or events.

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    1. yes this is so right. for example in the 80s a bunch of musicians came together to sing “we are the world”. for events that were happening in Africa at the time the song is real beautiful

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      1. And to add off with LiveAid where Queen being the biggest event for that concert rais so much money to help Africa too. Like it crazy how one band who broke up prior to that event were able to reach its the goal to help raise money for people in need.

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    2. I totally agree I prefer when an artist makes music that’s about them and shows a more intimate side of themselves to us listeners, rather than them releasing music to get clout or jump on a bandwagon, which is something a lot of musicians do these days.

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  16. I realized before that without listeners music would not be able to make its way through. The music industry requires feedback. For example streams we stream music so musicians can know we like it and that contributes to them getting paid. We also play them on radios and many more. We contribute to the success as much as the musicians do.

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      1. yeah, that’s true so many artics today are famous because of us without them streaming their music we wouldn’t even know who they are.

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    1. Hi Bcelestain,I agree with you, we the listeners contribute greatly to the success as much as the musicians do.

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  17. Everybody influences music in their own ways. The audience can determine whether or not a song is nice and if it will reach the charts. I like music and i’m sure others do too cause that’s the way we are able to express emotion and feelings. It’s still shocking to me how music can be connected to each other still from the old times. What do you guys think ?

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  18. Howdy, “Musicking: To music is to take part, in any capacity, in a musical performance, whether by performing, by listening, by rehearsing or practicing, by providing material for performance (what is called composing), or by dancing” I really like that because I realized i do all three things, I listen to music then I practice it and I record it so I can hear myself play. music is just so beautiful and its just a great way to express. yourself . do any of you guys do all three? or make any kind of music ?

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  19. It’s funny how music and the solar system are related in a way the same concept. I Never know that Composer listeners and performers all rely on each other and also how music from today relies on the past. Music in a way can be a time machine having us travel to the pass by its sound. Do you guys feel that you travel back in time when you hear old music that is playing?

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  20. When I read that composers throughout history compose music with different intentions, different ideas, and different purposes, thoughts flooded my mind. That made me think of how one can almost differentiate certain types of music just by listening to it. Hence, it’s a different style. Listening to music from different styles is really like a time travel as mentioned in the discussion. When you listen music such as, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik by Mozart, you can imagine him performing his piece to a crowd of White-wig wearing middle class people in the late 1700s. And it’s amazing how modern performers are able to perform in the original style of music written in a certain time period. It’s like making the history of that musical piece come back to life.

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  21. Yikes, would I ever thought of listening to a variety of music would keep a cycle going in the music industry, yes but no. Understanding that views and plays would allow an artist to hit top charts but ever thinking we important though. I mean yea, duh but hey that’s cool. Anyways this online discussion was fairly interesting, related to this quote “As you exist in the present, you’re also mentally in another time,” linking to the music of Bruno Mars, getting that 80s vibe, traveling back in time, linking to dreams, to arts at an exhibition, to a scientific novel in hand. Music seems to connect with everything, instruments then are instruments now, notes then are notes now, let alone time traveling with composers now conduct music then. Having flashbacks from old songs is delightful don’t yah think? What flashbacks do you guys have from listening old songs?

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  22. Hi Everyone!!!
    This week’s online discussion “Musicking” is really interesting. Before reading, I had no idea how vividly I contribute to music. Simply by listening, I am contributing which really stands out to me. I personally like Small’s argument of how we the listeners, have an important role to play when it comes to “making music.” Overall, this week’s discussion really broadened my knowledge of the ‘making of music.’ What are some other ways we contribute to music that are not listed/mentioned in the discussion ?

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  23. Listening to music is an action that brings people together, listening does play a very big part in the creation of music because, how can you create something you cannot hea? When creating music is you won’t get it right on the first try so you have to do various listening tests in order to make your final product perfect. Music has emotions and we find that out by listening. Music helps people interact together for example when you listen to music with other people the vibe is even stronger, more opinions equal better creations. In order to make good music you have to listen to the different parts in a track and make sure that you keep an open ear because different people like different types of music. How can the listening experience be enhanced? Why is it important to listen to music with others?

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    1. I agree when you listen to music with other people the vibe is even stronger. Like for example in concerts you end up making friends and the thing you have in common is the music you’re listening too. I think listening to music with others is a way to connect with them in a way you wouldn’t if you weren’t listening to music.

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  24. Hi guys
    I never really thought about this question, ” There’s the experience right now of listening to the music, but is that the only place you are?”. I agree when I listen to a song i used to listen when i was 10, it takes me back to that childhood memory.
    What i took from this reading is that listening to music as a listener is a big deal because it’s different from anyone else’s way of listening. I think that’s what really evolves to the music now and the future.
    What did you guys take from this reading?

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  25. I totally can relate to music taking me back in time. The song from Mozart brought me back to my child hood because that was one of the main songs in the show, The little einsteins. Also never would I have thought that I contribute to music. Did you guys know that before reading the material? I sure didnt. I didnt even know what musiking was lol.

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  26. when i read the part about a song bringing you back in time. it made me think of one song I would always listen to over the summer and it brought back all the memories of that summer. Its crazy how a song can make a memory so vivid in your head. Also remixes have been getting more popular and thats a good example of people coming together to create more music, some also make remixes to old beats. My question is do you think this new generation of music is changing it for the better or worse, we are talking about people breaking boundaries and creating NEW music

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  27. I could totally relate to this post. Sometimes I find myself listening to music that makes me reminisce over good and sad times, that may have happened in my life . What’s a song that you guys listen to, that makes you reminisce?

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  28. The way artists act on stage has really changed over time. In 2020, rappers jump and yell on stage. Artists yell on stage in order to engage their audience. I agree that a piece of music needs three kinds of people.

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  29. i enjoyed this week’s reading, but I wanted to add different input on the section titled “Multiple simultaneous orbits”. I believe that the image/shape doesn’t necessarily have to be a triangle with the composer, performer, and consumer at different points but, the composer can also be the producer, if multitalented. what stood out to you guys in this week’s reading?

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    1. Authentically recreating a piece of music from the past by using the same type of instrument in terms of material in order to add another layer to the musical experience stuck out to me a lot.

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  30. Reading the work I never imagined how much of a big influence we are too the musicians. But while i was reading it i slowly realized it how musicians notice which music we listen to more what type of music it is either loud and poppy, or slow a depressing we help the musicians to create their music which is amazing.

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  31. hello everyone.
    what really caught my attention was Wolfgang piece of music, it made me think of sad and happy memories from the past. while i was listening to it, i was in another world. i also agree with what the article said that the more you know the artist, the more you will understand their music. has music had you guys thinking about the past??

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    1. Hi Manzanob. Truthfully speaking, no matter what kind of music you listen to, it will always bring back some memories from the past. Some songs you can just relate to and just wonder “what if”.

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  32. I didn’t realize the role I had in the musicking process until the “when” I am when I listen to a song is brought up. This is a key part of the listening experience that many people overlook but we almost anyone that heard a song during an important or memorable moment in their life will subconsciously link that music to the memory of that event. For me, this is the most active role that I’ve taken in the process because sometimes even when i can’t recall a certain memory, I’ll still be humming to a song that I recall from that time. What other roles have you guys partaken in in the musicking process?

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    1. I completely agree with you. There are so many things that we link music to, but I believe memories is one of the greatest. One song can make you happy, and one song could make you sad just because you remember something or someone.

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  33. Honestly, I think this another one of my fave discussion. Can we just take a second to appreciate music and how much it has developed through out the year and has impacted a lot of us. I feel like in todays generation social media and online platforms like youtube, sound cloud etc for musicians play a huge part in helping them pursue a successful career in the music industry. Without those platforms they wouldn’t be able to share their music and gain exposure. Social media can also be a positive or negative influence depending on how artist promote their music. Many artists in this generation, would not be as famous if it weren’t for social media and them promoting not only their music but letting their fans get a sneak peek into their day to day lives, which leads me to ask, if social media didn’t exist at all, do you guys think artists today would be willing to do what old composers use to do to get to the top? Do you think they would be able to be patient with building their career the old fashion way?

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  34. When listening to someone sing or play an old song it never came to my mind the fact that a person had to first write the song and had to be found in order for me in present day to find it and enjoy it. Those scenarios never played out until now. The triangle is really something to wander over, because it had to go through many ears and years for it to finally reach me, and at because it reached me it’ll most likely reach someone else so on and so forth.

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