Online discussion #7 will be available for comments October 10-16. The rubric I’ll be using to grade your participation and a description of these assignments is available here.

 


Before you even started your journey in Mu 101 this semester, you’d likely heard the music of Beethoven, and probably knew his name.

He’s one of those figures that everybody just kind of knows, right? He’s a figure that, in the back of your mind, causes something to prod you with a nagging sensation that you should be able to at least say something about him, because he’s totally an important historical figure, duh.

You could name your dog after him and no one would bat an eye.

Beethoven movie
A classic film from 1992

 

Everybody loves Raymond Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) is “one of those guys” because his music has been so celebrated, without pause, since his lifetime. People have turned to Beethoven at various crucial historical moments, using his music to convey the notion of overcoming struggle, unity, and humanity:

  • Established in 1845, the Beethoven Quartet Society (London) was one of the first groups devoted solely to the performance and study of the music of a single composer. Their repertoire? String quartets by Beethoven.
  • The Nazi Party in Germany regarded Beethoven’s music as the apex of human achievement and of German culture, encouraging performances of it regularly.
  • Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 was included on the “Golden Record,” a series of recordings to represent the humans of Earth to the universe sent into space with the Voyager I and II spacecraft in 1977.
  • At the tearing down of the Berlin Wall in 1989, which had divided the German capital since World War II, Leonard Bernstein conducted an orchestra comprised of musicians from the former Allied and Axis powers in a performance of the “Ode to Joy” from Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9.
  • Symphony No. 9 has been adopted by several European nations and groups as its anthem, including the E.U.

During his life, Beethoven’s music was shocking for many listeners. It was bigger, bolder, louder, and more striking than anything that had come before it. More than that, it seemed spiritual for many listeners, especially as participation in organized religion declined during the 19th century—music, especially instrumental music for large symphony orchestras, steps in to fill the void of connecting people with the sense of a higher power.

hoffman, eta
E.T.A. Hoffmann (1776-1822)

Descriptions of classical music from the 19th century are a gold mine for juicy, transcendental musical experiences. People believed music could offer them entry into unseen worlds, and composers tried to live up to these expectations. Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (1776–1822), like many other listeners, first felt a connection with things beyond himself when listening to the music of Ludwig van Beethoven, and this feeling (even though he doesn’t use the same words as Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi, since he’s not a 20th-century psychologist), implies that he’s had a flow experience.

 

“Thus Beethoven’s instrumental music opens up to us also the realm of the monstrous and the immeasurable. Burning flashes of light shoot through the deep night of this realm and we become aware of giant shadows that surge back and forth, driving us into narrower and narrower confines until they destroy us—but not the pain of that endless longing in which each joy that has climbed aloft in jubilant song sinks back and is swallowed up, and it is only in this pain, which consumes love, hope, and happiness but does not destroy them, which seeks to burst our breasts with a many-voices consonance of all the passions, that we live on, enchanted beholders of the supernatural!… Beethoven’s music sets in motion the lever of fear, of awe, of horror, of suffering, and wakens just that infinite longing which is the essence of romanticism…”

—E.T.A. Hoffmann, Beethoven’s Instrumental Music (1813)

 

Leonard Bernstein: the charming Beethoven fanboy

Below is a 1954 episode of Omnibusa TV program that aired on Sunday afternoons in the US during the 1950s and 1960s. It was funded by the Ford Foundation as an effort to educate Americans culturally. The main speaker throughout this episode is Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), an American composer, conductor, and educator. He hosted several episodes of Omnibus, each about a different musical topic, such as Johann Sebastian Bach, Ludwig van Beethoven, conducting, jazz, and opera.

In the video, Bernstein discusses why he finds Beethoven to be a fascinating and inspiring figure, illustrating Beethoven’s creative process and the difficulty he had in shaping his music into its final form. Bernstein demonstrates excerpts from Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 at the piano, with scores (sheet music), and a full orchestra. He uses many vocabulary words we’ve already come across in class and in assigned readings—he’s speaking a language you now know!

As a frame of reference, here’s a recording of the piece of music the video dissects:

 

In the video, I love how Bernstein’s admiration for Beethoven comes through—he’s picking apart Beethoven’s musical ideas with care, respect, and thoroughness, seeking to appreciate (and share with his viewers) Beethoven’s compositional process and skill.

Leonard Bernstein, Omnibus, “Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony” (1954):

 

But why Beethoven?

But why has Beethoven been such an inspiring figure for so many musicians and non-musicians alike? The short answer is that his music is really, really good. It’s satisfying to play, it’s inspiring to listen to, and it was a game-changer for Romantic Era music (it’s bigger, louder, longer, more intense, and conveys a greater sense of personal conviction than anything that came before it). (See some musicians’ musings about Beethoven’s music here: 05-handout-quotes-on-beethoven-1805-1862)

The long answer involves aspects of who Beethoven is in the imaginations of his listeners and admirers:

  • An independent thinker who defied cultural norms and instead followed his own ideas in both music and society
  • A hard worker and perfectionist—Beethoven’s obvious difficulty in getting his music “right” is a big part of what inspires Bernstein, and there’s often something comforting about seeing a person create great work not out of effortless talent but rather out of sheer force of unrelenting will
  • A shrewd businessman who made classical music profitable in the free market economy
  • A firm believer in the equality of man (an Enlightenment principle)
  • Oh, and he was deaf for much of his adult life following an infection—the notion that a person could overcome a physical disability so obviously shattering to his professional career is often one of the biggest sources of inspiration people draw from Beethoven’s biography

In short, Beethoven fulfills the role of a hero.

batman logo

Final thoughts

At a certain point, it stops mattering whether a hero is as good as everyone says he is—it only matters that people think he’s great, because it’s that assumption of greatness, of being inspired, that guides future choices and actions. The more time passes, the more his identity is equated with how people perceived and received his work—the myth becomes the man in our minds. In the case of Beethoven, the awe, the reverence, and the seemingly impossible standards he established guide subsequent musicians to their aesthetic ideals. For us as inheritors of a post-Beethoven world in the 21st century, that means that our musical experiences are shaped by a set of assumptions we may take for granted: orchestral music is big, long, and loud; the notion that music can be spiritually moving; classical music is “serious”; and it doesn’t matter if the audience “gets” it because the creator is assumed to be a genius.

-Dr. J.

 

No conversation-starting questions this week—I don’t want to dictate where the conversation goes, and there’s plenty to think about here without them!

94 thoughts on “Ludwig van Beethoven (Online discussion #7)

  1. Beethoven was a great musician. He overcame great odds. In my opinion, not only was he talented, but he was diligent and perfected his music to such an extent that he wrote music while he was deaf. He practically revolutionized music in his era. He wasn’t hesitant to explore the depth and breadth of music. He allowed himself to create music that affects and moves everyone who cares to listen in a way most music cannot and one realizes the power of music and ‘new’ emotions that you go through because of one piece of music. The excellence of his music is it appeals to music gurus and amateurs and all everyone can say is wow! Its just amazing.

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  2. Beethoven will always be a name that I believe everyone will know. You may not know why or how he got to be as famous as he is if you know only his name. But his name will always be in culture and heard around the world. Besides being overly talented, dedicated to what he loved doing, and a business man, he was also an inspiration to many artists and composers. He broke away from the normal styles that everyone labeled as traditional, and he brought loud sounds and big bangs to music. A new way of expressing emotion into music without having to say a single word. Not to mention the most remarkable thing, he was deaf in most of his adult life. People struggle hearing and understanding music when they can hear it full blast let alone not hearing a single sound. He showed to the human public that anything is possible. He showed it doesn’t matter what disability you have, as long as you have passion in what you are doing, and never give up anything is possible. He brought a new era of music that speaks to you through sound, and became an inspiration to anyone with a disability or anyone who thinks you cannot do something. That is why he will always be remembered as a huge part of the music industry.

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    1. I completely agree with you that the name Beethoven is a name that usually continues to grow from generation to generation, mostly because of his talent but also for being such an inspiring musician.

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    2. I agree with you that is why he will always be remembered as a huge part of the music industry. At the time, after Beethoven lost his hearing completely, Maelzel as a inventor of metronome and creative various devices, he helped Beethoven’s creative work by these devices. I think that he concerned with Beethoven’s genius with music talent and music industry at the time.

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  3. Beethoven is clearly someone who will always be remembered for being such an inspirational musician. One thing that i didn’t know about him was that he was deaf for the majority of his adult life. Just like our previous discussion about disabilities, those individuals along with Beethoven show complete dedication and strength to continue to make art regardless of their obstacle

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    1. I completely agree with you! I like the fact that you have related this to our previous discussion about disability. I think disability is just a matter of perception and having a disability doesn’t stop someone from doing anything glorious like Beethoven.

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      1. In fact, coming from a Indian family, I did not many American singer but Beethoven was one of those famous, genius and, inspirational figure that I knew about him before I came into this country which was about 8 years ago. This was when I couldn’t even speak English properly but this discussion informed me about his deafness as well which surprised me because I never heard this before or read about it anywhere.

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    1. I didn’t know Ludwig Beethoven’s music was played at so many famous, historical moments to represent “overcoming struggle, unity, and humanity…”. It really shows how universally valued Beethoven is.

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  4. When we read about the history of classical music Ludwig Van Beethoven was and remains today as an influential figure. I think his pieces of music has a power of inspiration and expressiveness. I was amazed by the fact that he was deaf and yet he had managed to be on of the most accomplished composer of the world. He undoubtedly had a strong and passionate personaliy and that’s probably what people loved most about him among other things. He was also able to handle some really severe hardships in his life. Being sick most of his life and the fact that he had managed to live into his 50’s producing some of the greatest works of the classical era that says a lot about the strength of his character and also speaks to us how awesome he was!!!

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    1. After reading our online discussion about disabilities, I think that when someone has any form of disability it empowers them and makes them overcome their odds to do amazing things. I think Beethoven’s deafness made him better.

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    2. As Karl has ever said ” losing his social interaction caused Beethoven to look within himself, to delve to greater depths, to see answers to profound spiritual questions, to find strength within himself and his faith… and all those things are reflected in his music. So while it might not have been that his musical output was directly related to his becoming deaf, the originality of it might have sprung from the person Beethoven had become as a result of his deafness”. so maybe after the deafness, Beethoven may think more about the meaning of life, and that will show in his work.

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      1. both of you guys are right. I think deafness shaped Beethoven’s music. It has profoundly affected his compositions in a better way.

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    3. Before learning of Beethoven as person I was exposed to his music via children’s shows and various music, his pieces along with others are still currently being used as background music and to me to have his music keep him alive for so long is incredible he was creating music that was so ahead of his time coupled with
      losing his hearing to not being able to hear at all. The passion he put into his music made all the difference.

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        1. I think he brought to his music a sense of overcoming adversities, being better in spite of the odds and making the best of what can easily be the worst of circumstances. I think he resilience he had, the drive for excellence and perfection seeped into his music after he was deaf.

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    4. I definitely think tat his pieces after his deafness was different then of those that were composed before his deafness. His pieces after his deafness was more emotional in the sense of his feelings and how he feels about not being capable of hearing. One other reason I think like that is because ge knew that he was missing something that most musicians and most people around him could hear therefore he marries to make his music extra good from his effort and his feelings so that this disability of his does not affect his music.

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  5. As many of us have learned that Beethoven was deaf. I do also feel that was one of the most interesting thing I’ve read on this week discussion. This just supports one of our past discussions about artist with disabilities. He is a great example on how you can still be great with any disability. Just being able to make the best of it and being as great as you want. Beethoven is a well known name in many homes. We may not know much about him but many people know he was a great musician and had many influences inshaping the music we listen to today. There are so many musicians that were amazing and thank God for them because of it wasn’t for them imagine where music would be now.

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  6. Where do you think music would be without influences as such as Beethoven? Would it be the same? Better? Worst?

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    1. I think it would be worst because Beethoven’s symphonies have changed the world. He is viewed as a transitional figure in the history of music because he has done an extensive development through his creation of unique music materials, themes, and harmonies. Without his works music would not be any better than now.

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  7. The best thing about classical music is that a lot of the time we don’t even realize that we are hearing a certain composer. In commercials, tv shows, movies and any form of media there is a great chance of us hearing a popular piece of classical music. Even in class, I realize that a lot of the music that Dr. J plays I’ve heard somewhere else. Beethoven is probably the greatest example of this. I can’t even remember how many times I’ve heard the Fifth Sympathy. I think its great that these composers from so long ago are remembered and their music is incorporated into our daily lives.

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  8. Beethoven is one of the greats but does anyone have another composer from the Romantic Era that interests them? I also enjoy Mozart!

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    1. I learned about Robert Schumann in high school. One interesting fact about him is that he left the study of law to become a pianist. Some of his works are amazing.

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  9. If you were someone like Leonard Bernstein, a fanboy of Beethoven, which artists would you be a fan of and why?

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  10. Beethoven reminds so much of Stevie Wonder because they both are well known musicians with a disability. But it does not stop them from showing off their talents and giving up on their musical talent. It’s very inspirational for others because it shows that they can overcome any obstacles. Music is for everyone even if they are deaf or blind.

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    1. I was thinking the exact thing. The motivation and ability to succeed by both artist is truly inspirational and can be obvious to why they are both so iconic.

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  11. That piece was simply amazing! I can’t even imagine how many people he’s inspired over the years. How dedicated and just how exquisite Beethoven is. Even if you’ve never heard any of his pieces, you’ve heard of his name because of the impact he’s made throughout the history of music. I love that there’s so many artists who don’t let anything get to doing what they want to do. It’s amazing to know that there’s so many people in this world capable of doing the most and having such perseverance and determination.

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  12. Do people musicians and artists with disabilities naturally outshine people with no disabilities? Or do their disabilities make them better?

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    1. People who can’t see tend to be better musicians because they depend not on their ears . They have some of the best ears to play music.

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    2. I think disabled people are more talented than normal people. If God takes something from them, he blesses them with other unique skills and capabilities. And that way it makes them better.

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    3. I think people pay more attention to their work to see the outcome. To see if the disability with negetivly effect what they’re creating. When it works out they build up the artist to use them as a positive example for other disabled persons.

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  13. I believe that Beethoven is one of the best musician of his era the romantic era is one of the nicest of all time. What would this era be when if Beethoven was not around . He has made an impact to this world with his music

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  14. Beethoven is a good musician and he totally left his mark and legacy on music so that people would know who he is. The way that his compositions are structured and his sound selection is good, his influence in music is still being used today

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  15. Beethoven is a perfect musician. his work is still famous till nowadays. and also he is not a man who care authority and social rank that much. he would like to show people if they enjoy his music, but he would stop perform at the piano if the audience chatted amongst themselves, or afforded him less than their full attention. i see he born for music and his music can show his attitude for each period of his life.

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    1. From my experience and the way I have seen most people and the way our society is, I think Beethoven’s personal life was definietly influenced by his deafness but not in a good way. He must have faced problems and must have felt helpers at many times of his life because of his deafness. He must have had felt this vibe from some people in his life where he felt not only helplessness but also this fact that he is disable and not capable of doing things or normal life daily things that everyone else could have done in everyday life. This feeling of helplessness and not being able to express himself through just words must have influenced his musical felid then. He definitely became that gold of music through having this experience along with him.
      Since you asked this question, I want to know if. you agree. Let me know if you agree, please.

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    1. Probably years Beethoven studied music like no tomorrow he knew beyond what he was doing and for anyone to just say I’m gonna analyze Beethoven’s music without feeling nervous would seem redundant because it takes a musical genius to understand another musical genius.

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  16. This week’s online discussion was inspirational and informative. To know that with Beethoven’s disability he was able to make so many great pieces of music is really amazing. To defy cultural norms in that time period, be passionate about what he loved, and put in the work to make it happen, just shows that anything is possible. I never knew that Beethoven was deaf. Knowing that he was, and yet one of his symphonies was sent into space in 1977 was eye opening. Someone who couldn’t hear, made music that people though was so great it was sent out into the universe potentially for other species to hear. I think that’s really dope, and it makes me want to put my all into everything I do from here on out.

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  17. The first thing that popped up in my mind during this discussion was the fact that Beethoven went deaf at a point in his life. This shows an idea of inspiration, idea of not giving up and the most important, an idea of proving others wrong about the connection music and disability has. Like I have mentioned earlier and always will repeat, music is an feeling and a way of expression. Beethoven’s deafness definitely had its disadvantages but it cannot be denied that him being deaf has got nothing to do with him being able to express himself. In fact, I think his deafness helped him in making better and more effective music in the sense of emotions and feelings which we already know was very effective in the romantic era. I believe so very hardcore because Beethoven case is that he was not always deaf, he became deaf later in his life but he was not born with it. When a person is blind from birth, they never complain or feel terrible about the fact that they can’t see because they have been blind since birth but when a person goes blind in an accident or for any reason when a person goes blind after being able top see, they feel like something is missing in them. They always feel this emptiness and complexity about not having something that they once perfectly had. This automatically increases the amount of pain and sadness in a way that they feel about not having something which I believe in Beethoven’s case, he felt and that helped him in his music and expression himself.

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    1. I agree with you, no matter what disability someone has, they can still create amazing pieces of music or do what they want to do. And maybe not be able to listen to what he wrote truly saw his true fillings.

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  18. Truthfully I don’t have much to say about Beethoven. It is a name you here quite often so I don’t even think anything of it. Sure it is amazing that he was deaf and he was able to make the music that he did but his music is not something that appeals to me.

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  19. I am a big fan of Beethoven work and to learn more about him makes me admire him so much more. He was a great musician as well as an inspiration to be better, to try harder and never give up. Even if he was deaf he still wrote pieces of music so great that even after years we still listen to them and talk about them, his name will be one that will forever be remembered. I hope I was able to meet him but at least I get to learn about him and his music.

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  20. What do you think made Beethoven music great, his life or that he was deaf? Do you think because he couldn’t hear his pieces he was able to put more feelings on them? How could you have reacted if you were in Beethoven place?

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    1. I think Beethoven’s deaf made his music great, because his deaf he had more inspiration to create music. Even though he couldn’t hear his piece, he could feel it in his heart, because he already played the song in his heart before he wrote it down.

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    2. I think that the talent and creativity that Beethoven had when making music while not being able to hear makes him and his music so great. Its inspirational to those who would like to make music because even though they have a disability Beethoven gives them hope that anything is possible.

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      1. Beethoven was determine to continue to compose music even if it will lead him to his death. If I was him, I would be happy to know that people love my music even if i could not hear them. He still seen the reactions of the listeners so that probably could be a factor to motivate him to write music.

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    3. Beethoven’s music was great not because of how he lived his life or because he was physically impaired, to me his music was great because he would push all those aspects of himself away and with every note he would put a part of himself into the song, he would give it a meaning only he knew could be understood. His music was full of love and passion, it was full of everything Beethoven had to offer.

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  21. For me, Beethoven is one of the famous musician I have heard. I was shocked also when I first time know he was deaf, I felt sorry for him because he was such a great musician and loved music so much but the fate is so unfair and took his hearing away. But I am not feeling sorry for him anymore, the thing he suffered made him a great musician. I’ve heard the story of him uses a stick to touch the keyboard of piano to feel all the notes, and that’s how he wrote the “Symphony destiny” out, his tragic life is the motivation of his inspiration. On the other hand, because his deaf, his music is bigger, louder and more touched than the other music in his century. I think the reason that his music were louder than others came from his desire of hear sounds again, he make the music louder and bigger, so he might hear the melody. What do you guys think?

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  22. I pay attention that Ludwig van Beethoven is hero of life with his obstacle as a human. First, he made his financial independence by contract with Vienna’s the aristocratic class and princes (from linked text in “But Why Beethoven”). At the time, before this contract musicians alike such as even Mozart, Bach and Hayden, so on) became servant in the aristocratic families. Because of this, the musicians wouldn’t have free for their creations. However, Beethoven’s financial independence would be his creative work, without money being a hindrance, and affect his immortal music creations. I think that financial independence is important to all musicians. Second, after he became a deaf, he threw all himself into his musical work. Even though he was born with genius of music talent, his lost hearing must be big obstacle for him. However, he had overcome his handicap, and had created immortal music, symphony no.5. I understand now why people call destiny for symphony no. 5.

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    1. I like symphony no.5, too.The ebullience of life lifted the end of music, Beethoven longed for happiness, he did not want to believe his own misfortune was incurable, he longed to be cured, he longed for love, he was full of hope. Symphony no.5 is the exact thing that he wants to express,The hero gains his final victory in the fierce struggle against fate against the dark forces of evil.

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  23. Beethoven has a lot of excellent qualities, not just the talent on music, especially what I admire is his tenacity to fight against the fate.Beethoven’s childhood was painful, and life seemed to him like a tragic and brutal struggle. He was forced to learn instruments by his father.As he grew older, the pain came again, slowly the hearing of Beethoven’s ears was declining, and his insides were suffering from severe pain.His body every day is worse than a day. Still, he never gave up on music. It takes courage and perseverance to know that Beethoven is unwavering in the face of such difficulties.Whenever I meet with difficulties and shrink back, whenever I suffer setbacks and cry, I will think of Beethoven’s figure, the tenacious character is worthy of our study, we will always do when we think about him as a role model, no matter what happens, no matter what difficulties, we should all be perseverance like him.

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    1. I agree with your response entirely. To be fairly honest when I was learning about Beethoven as I was coming of age,I never grown to like the artist himself, but recently after reading all the assigned reading for Beethoven’s background stories. I have developed understanding and sympathy for someone who gone through such calamity. He was basically portrayed as a brilliant human being throughout his struggles, but composed a prolonging inspiration of pieces impressively.

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  24. Similarly to our previous discussions throughout the classes, this discussion was both compelling and captivating to read and listen to Beethoven’s legacy. Beethoven’s 5th symphony was absolutely remarkable because of how he developed his notes throughout the movement, his improvisation, and it was unusual at the time. It was quite suspenseful and his motives throughout the initial theme. The clarinets and strings were played gracefully for the audience and listeners in general, as well as the horns and violas for the second theme. There wasn’t even an introduction, he just jumped right into the piece. Instead of repeating the motive he expands it majestically, and creates a conversation between woodwinds, and strings, from two notes, to single notes, with a building excitement. He had the exposition, development, recapitulation, and coda. There is a significant cadence to give a interlude for the woodwinds . It felt as though he had a checklist of
    variations throughout the composition. Additionally I was invigorated by this piece, especially by the journey it takes you on. Beethoven contributions were mind-blowing, fascinating, strategically created and triumphant. The emotions conveyed allowed me to sympathize with them and it also humanizes them.He was truly gifted, and a true legend. A man named Gerard Schwarz, provided a helpful analysis throughout his YouTube video provided – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4hZY5h84Wc.

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  25. Would you expect Beethoven to be a great composer if his life, in regards to his particular circumstances, or conditions, were more balanced and uplifted with happiness? Or does his hardships define who he is as a composer and what he is able to compose?

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  26. When people think about Beethoven, their thoughts automatically go to music which is great. What people don’t know is that he’s so much more than his music. One thing that I found interesting was that he was fighting for equality. One without morals and value doesn’t go agaisnt the norms of society. This said a lot about his character and ethics.

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  27. Beethoven is just one of those historical figures and exceptions in life that defies
    the odds through the test of times for someone to compose masterpieces deaf going blind is something only a superhuman can do, and it’s not like he wrote basic music he wrote music theorists study that’s a high accomplishment for someone of his time with his disabilities. I personally think he’s symphony no. 5 is beautiful when it calms down then the violins play very loud like it came out of nowhere. Beethoven is truly an inspiration and a clear historical figure especially for me. My favorite Beethoven piece is Moonlight Sonata which I urge anyone to listen too. Truly everything Beethoven will stand through the test of time. Anyone has any favorite Beethoven songs? Or does anyone have any information not mention they would like to share?

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  28. I think it’s very interesting that in the 19th century music was used to fill the void left by the decrease of participation in organized religion. It kind of shows that we as humans need something to bridge us to something higher than ourselves, whether we believe in religion or not. It’s something that’s being done still, even in today’s society. Some people believe in religion and some don’t but everyone listens to music in some capacity.

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  29. What is it about music that makes it possible for people to use it as a way to connect to something greater? Is it possible to replace religion with music?

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    1. I wanted too say that if you think about the church, isnt it built on music? Ever since its foundation they have started creating songs to entice believers.

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  30. Beethoven is a very inspirational musician to me because he continued to make music even though he was close to becoming deaf. He was dedicated to composing music and he didn’t let anything get in his way. This is influential because many people wouldn’t bother to continue making music if they were becoming deaf, they would just give up. Beethoven was admired and his music was symbolic to me beucase it expressed his feelings toward playing the violin.

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    1. I would agree he most likely felt that he had to write a few more songs before he could no longer hear them. Their like his children he wants to take care and love them because he cant say when he himself might leave.

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  31. “During his life, Beethoven’s music was shocking for many listeners. It was bigger, bolder, louder, and more striking than anything that had come before it.” I love this because I’ve always loved music that isn’t afraid to push boundaries. Music should be for the cautious, it should make a splash and inspire. Even when faced with deafness, Beethoven move onward. It was his dedication and passion that allowed him to succeed and make a mark on music history forever.

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    1. I believe that the whole world knows who Beethoven is, coming from Europe europeans traveled the world in early times and brought Beethoven music with them and every inch of the world knows his music.

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  32. “People believed music could offer them entry into unseen worlds” I always thought that music was an integral part of human history. I have been thinking that music seems to be as important as our own history, music to many people is just a piece to listen too but i would have to disagree. In many wars music is played to maintain order and discipline, wars would not have been won without music and when people do great deeds music is also played to honor them. Even in The present music is used as a national banner for patriotism, like how many countries use Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 as their anthem. And if the human race does not perish I think Beethoven and his music will probably live for the most part of our history.

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  33. I feel like a lot of people don’t realize how important Beethoven compositions are . He litterally shaped history with his music . His music was big part of German culture , his music brought nations together .his music has so much praise that we literally agreed to let his music represent us by sending it out into space for other life forms to hear . I never truly realized how important he is and how monumental his music is

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  34. In history, we have records of many different things that went on around the world. One of those things’ s is Musicians and there life story’s one of those Musicians is Beethoven. Beethoven was a music composer and his music was/still is in every corner of the world literally. The thing that made Beethoven a unique music composer was that he was deaf. I believe that what made Beethoven’s music so inspirational, was the fact of his condition being (deaf).
    Do any of you guys believe that Beethoven’s condition made him strive to produce really good classical music?

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  35. It seems to me that in general Beethoven was very influential because his music portrayed a certain sound that people weren’t used to just yet, and its quite interesting t o see that even to those we look at as the worst group ever formed the German Nazis they still hold Beethoven with an amount of respect that even they would play his songs. He truly seems to just be one of those historical figures that can create such an influence that it is acceptable among many.

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  36. How would Beethoven explain his ideas about music and symphonies to composers of the past and ones from the future from his point of view. And what would a song created by him and a fellow composer sound like.

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  37. Beethoven is definitely one of the greatest of all time. One of the best to ever do it(“it” being music). One of the most respected men in the history of the music industry. His influence has flowed throughout time, helping shape a new generation. The generation of music, which has brought many people of multiple ethnic backgrounds together. To this day, it still does. Music continuously evolves, through different genres and such. And we can thank Beethoven for giving a base to musicians of the future. Youth of the present and the future definitely have to learn about Beethoven, so they can understand who initially made music as big as it is today. They must come to know that the musicians and artists they love and enjoy today, would not be here if it weren’t for Beethoven and his influence.

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